Security Advisory

Phone Scam Alert : Beware of automated voice phone calls that require an interactive response and subsequently lead to the caller asking for your personal or banking information
15 October 2016
Threat: Phone scam
Severity: Medium


What it does

There has been an increase in scams targeting individuals via automated voice messages or phone calls. The latest variation of the scam involves Mandarin speaking callers pretending to be police officers or government officials.

The callers may inform you that you are involved in money laundering / criminal activities and instruct you to key in your banking details via a link to a fake website which may look like a law enforcement website such as the Singapore Police Force website.

The callers will also ask you to provide your banking details to avoid being prosecuted by the law.

Banking details include:
  1. ATM, credit cards, debit cards and Personal Identification Number (PIN).
  2. Online Banking Access Code, PIN and One-Time Password (OTP).

To avoid any unauthorised access to your bank accounts, please be mindful to never reveal such information to unknown callers. We advise you to stay vigilant and take the necessary precaution to protect yourself.


How to protect yourself

  • Be wary of unsolicited Mandarin speaking callers claiming to be police officers or government officials.
  • Never reveal or key in your personal banking details such as ATM, Credit/Debit Card numbers, their PINs, Online Banking Access Code, PIN and OTP into websites or mobile apps.
  • Always read the SMS alerts sent to your mobile phone for your transactions carefully.
  • Be wary of callers asking you to generate the OTP from your hardware token and revealing the OTP to them over the phone.
  • Be mindful of calls from police officers, government officials or anyone else asking for your OCBC Online Banking login credentials.
  • Do note that OCBC Bank staff will never ask you for your OCBC Online Banking PIN or OTP over the phone.
  • Call the bank immediately if you detect any suspicious alerts or transactions not performed by you.
  • Ignore calls from unsolicited callers. Scammers may use Caller ID spoofing technology to mask their actual phone numbers and display a different number.
  • Update us immediately when there is a change in your contact details such as mobile number or email address.
  • If you suspect that you have received illegal funds, do not use it. Please inform us and lodge a police report immediately.
For more information on such scams, please visit: www.scamalert.sg/types-of-scams/impersonation-scam


What you should do

If you notice any unusual/unauthorised transactions such as receiving funds you did not expect, SMS transaction alerts or email notifications for transactions you did not initiate, please call us immediately at 1800 363 3333 or +65 6363 3333 (when calling from overseas).

Learn more about Phishing, Malware and Online Banking security.

防范电话诈骗

2016年10月15日
威胁: 电话诈骗
严重性:


如何运行

近日,通过自动语音或人工致电进行的电话诈骗与日俱增。最新的欺诈形式涉及一些使用中文的来电者,意图冒充警察或政府官员实施欺诈。

来电者将会表示,您已涉嫌卷入洗钱或其它犯罪活动,并指示您在某个特定网站输入您的个人银行详细资料,以便协助调查。该网站可能类似一个执法部门或政府组织的官方网站,例如:新加坡警察部队网站。

来电者同时还可能要求您提供个人银行详细资料,以免“受到法律制裁”。

对方可能要求您提供的银行资料包括:
  1. 自动提款卡(ATM),信用卡/借记卡号码,以及个人识别密码(PIN)。
  2. 网上银行代码,个人识别密码和一次性密码(OTP)。
为了避免任何未经授权的人侵入您的银行帐户,请记得不要向这些来历不明的来电者提供此类信息。我们提醒您保持警惕,并采取必要的预防措施以保护您的财产。


您要如何保护自己?

  • 提防自称是警察或政府官员并使用中文沟通的来电者。
  • 不要向来历不明的来电者透露您的个人银行详细资料或在不明的网站和移动应用程序中输入如下信息:例如自动提款卡(ATM),信用卡/借记卡号码及其密码,网上银行登录代码,个人识别密码和一次性密码(OTP)。
  • 切记仔细阅读发送到您手机的SMS短讯,以确认在您帐户所进行的交易。
  • 警惕来电者要求您通过电话向他们透露由硬件令牌生成的一次性密码(OTP)。
  • 请提防自称警察、政府官员或任何要求您提供网上银行登录资料的电话。
  • 华侨银行的员工绝不会通过电话要求您提供华侨银行网上银行登录密码(PIN)或一次性密码(OTP)。
  • 如果您发现任何可疑的通知或未经您操作的交易,请立即致电华侨银行。
  • 直接拒绝来历不明的电话。诈骗集团有可能通过技术手段掩盖实际电话号码,显示出虚假的号码。
  • 如果您的联系方式有所更改,例如变更了手机号码或电子邮件地址,请立即通知华侨银行。
  • 如果您怀疑您收到非法资金,请不要使用。请立即通知华侨银行并向警方报案。
  • 如想进一步了解此类电话欺诈信息,请访问: www.scamalert.sg/types-of-scams/impersonation-scam

查阅防范恶意软件和网上银行安全须知。

The above is for general information only and provided solely as a convenience to you. No representation or warranty (whether on adequacy or usefulness or otherwise) is given by OCBC. You confirm that you are responsible for the security of your computer and mobile devices and OCBC assumes no responsibility to you in relation thereto. We refer you to our online banking safe security practices at Safeguarding Your Online Banking Access. Your usage of our OCBC Online Banking Service is subject at all times to the Electronic Banking Terms & Conditions and the Terms & Conditions Governing Deposit Accounts.



Malware Alert: Stealing your card details and intercepting your SMS One Time Password (OTP)
15 November 2016
Threat: SVPENG
Severity: Medium


What it does

The SVPENG banking Trojan is a malware that targets Android devices. The malware may be downloaded without your knowledge or approval when you visit a legitimate site displaying an infected advertisement distributed by the Google AdSense network. This can happen as soon as you access a page with an infected advertisement via your mobile device.

This malware can even hide itself after installation and cannot be traced in your list of downloaded apps despite launching itself in your mobile device. Also, it can gain access to administrator rights, which make it difficult for any antivirus software to remove it.

Once your mobile device is infected, the malware will comb through your device to collect various information and attempt to steal online banking credentials and cards information via phishing windows. It may also intercept SMS messages including One Time Passwords (OTP) that you may receive through your mobile device.


How to protect yourself

  • Ensure that your mobile device’s software / browser are kept up to date.
  • Refrain from downloading apps from unofficial app stores. Only install apps from official or trusted sources (i.e. Google Play Store);
  • Do not enable “unknown sources” setting (this can be found in your mobile phone under Settings > Security) in your Android device as this may allow installation of apps from sources other than the Google Play Store.
  • Always pay close attention to the permissions requested by apps. Do not grant unnecessary or excessive permissions to a mobile app.
  • Always install and maintain the latest anti-virus software on your mobile devices where possible.
  • In the event your device is being compromised, please use another non-infected phone to inform OCBC Bank immediately and call us at 1800 363 3333.

Learn more about Phishing, Malware and Online Banking security.

The above is for general information only and provided solely as a convenience to you. No representation or warranty (whether on adequacy or usefulness or otherwise) is given by OCBC. You confirm that you are responsible for the security of your computer and mobile devices and OCBC assumes no responsibility to you in relation thereto. We refer you to our online banking safe security practices at Safeguarding Your Online Banking Access. Your usage of our OCBC Online Banking Service is subject at all times to the Electronic Banking Terms & Conditions and the Terms & Conditions Governing Deposit Accounts.



Malware Alert: Stealing your banking credentials
3 August 2016
Threat: Zeus Panda
Severity: Medium


What it does

This malware, known as Zeus Panda, targets computers and attempts to steal your banking credentials to conduct unauthorised activities by placing fake overlay screens on top of the bank’s login page. It does so by displaying a phony message to the user claiming that his/her account is locked such as the one below:

A sample of the overlay pop-up deceiving you that your account is locked

Examples of overlay screens that are displayed asking for banking login credentials
This is an example. Note: This is not sent by OCBC Bank.
The malware then runs through a series of social engineering pop-up screens and requests the user for other sensitive banking details such as credit/debit card details in order to unlock the account.



A sample of the fraudulent overlay pop-up asking for your credit/debit card details and personal information

This is an example. Note: This is not sent by OCBC Bank.


How to protect yourself

  • Do not click on hyperlinks, attachments provided in emails from suspicious or unknown sources.
  • Do not proceed if you encounter any unfamiliar or suspicious screens or pop-up on banking portals prompting you to provide your banking login credentials or credit/debit card details.
  • Ensure that the anti-virus software in your computer is regularly updated.
Learn more about Phishing, Malware and Online Banking security.

The above is for general information only and provided solely as a convenience to you. No representation or warranty (whether on adequacy or usefulness or otherwise) is given by OCBC. You confirm that you are responsible for the security of your computer and mobile devices and OCBC assumes no responsibility to you in relation thereto. We refer you to our online banking safe security practices at Safeguarding Your Online Banking Access. Your usage of our OCBC Online Banking Service is subject at all times to the Electronic Banking Terms & Conditions and the Terms & Conditions Governing Deposit Accounts.



Mobile Malware Alert: Infecting your mobile phone and tricking you into revealing banking credentials (UPDATE)
6 June 2016 (Updated on 14 September 2016)
Threat: Marcher
Severity: Medium


What it does

Malware targeting mobile phones (especially Android phones) has been on the rise. One of which is known as Marcher. Such malware can infect your mobile phones when you click on hyperlinks, attachments in your emails or mobile messages (e.g. SMS, WhatsApp) from unknown sources, or when you download mobile apps from untrusted app stores (other than Google Play store or Apple App Store). It has also been reported recently that Marcher is infecting mobile phones by fraudulently posing as firmware security updates or imitating popular apps.

Once your mobile phone is infected with mobile malware, the malware will prompt for excessive or unusual permissions to be granted in order to obtain privileged access rights to your phone. If you grant such permissions, the malware can take control of your mobile phone and perform actions such as stealing or intercepting your SMS messages, showing fake overlay login screens on top of the Bank’s website/mobile app to ask for your banking login credentials or credit/debit card information.

Examples of overlay screens caused by mobile malware

Examples of overlay screens that are displayed asking for banking login credentials

This is an example of a phishing email. Note: This is not sent by OCBC Bank. This is an example of a phishing email. Note: This is not sent by OCBC Bank.



How to protect yourself

  • Keep your mobile device’s software up to date.
  • Do not click on hyperlinks, attachments provided in emails or mobile messages (e.g. SMS, WhatsApp) from suspicious or unknown sources.
  • Do not act on any instructions provided in unfamiliar pop-up screens, mobile messages (e.g. SMS, WhatsApp), or emails from suspicious sources which prompt you to provide your banking login credentials or credit/debit card details.
  • Only install or download mobile apps from trusted/official sources (i.e. Google Play store or Apple App Store).
  • Do not access online banking using 'jail-broken' or 'rooted' mobile devices.
  • Be wary when you are asked to grant excessive / unusual permissions to a mobile app.
  • Use another (non-infected) phone to inform OCBC Bank of any suspicious activities in your account by calling 1800 363 3333.
Learn more about Phishing, Malware and Online Banking security.

The above is for general information only and provided solely as a convenience to you. No representation or warranty (whether on adequacy or usefulness or otherwise) is given by OCBC. You confirm that you are responsible for the security of your computer and mobile devices and OCBC assumes no responsibility to you in relation thereto. We refer you to our online banking safe security practices at Safeguarding Your Online Banking Access. Your usage of our OCBC Online Banking Service is subject at all times to the Electronic Banking Terms & Conditions and the Terms & Conditions Governing Deposit Accounts.